• Golden Eye 0.1% w/v Eye Drops
    Golden Eye Drops Solution
  • Hypromellose 0.3% Eye Drops
    Hypromellose Eye Drops - For Dry Eyes
  • Optrex Bloodshot Eye Drops
    Optrex Bloodshot Eye Drops-ads
  • Viscotears Gel For Dry Eye
    Viscotears Gel For Dry Eye Treatment 10g
  • Golden Eye Chloramphenicol Eye
    Golden Eye Chloramphenicol Eye Ointment
  • Spatone Apple Liquid Iron
    Spatone Apple Liquid Iron Supplement-banner
  • Holland & Barrett Gentle Iron 20mg
    Holland & Barrett Gentle Iron 20mg 90 Capsules-banner
  • Vitabiotics Feroglobin Capsules
    Vitabiotics Feroglobin Capsules-banner

Black Women & Hot Flashes: Up to 14 Years Long

Chelcee Johns. February 17, 2015
Black women scenes

There she was waiting for the downtown A train, stripping out of wool hat, infinity scarf, leather gloves, long puffer coat. I figured it would stop there, but she continued with a little dance side to side and hands waving towards her face. No, this was not some crazy women, it was one who resembled an aunt of mines back in Detroit. She started to take off the next layer – a cashmere sweater when the train began to approach and she paused instead to open her arms wide and receive the blessing of the underground train wind. She was having a hot flash, much like many women as we reach middle age. However, new studies show that for Black women scenes like this may happen more frequently as Black women suffer from the effects of menopause longer A study published on Monday by JAMA Internal medicine found that hot flashes can continue for as long as 14 years, the earlier they start the longer they tend to last. This is a huge jump from the expected few years, women already sign up for.

The New York Times reports:

In a racially, ethnically and geographically diverse group of 1,449 women with frequent hot flashes or night sweats — the largest study to date — the median length of time women endured symptoms was 7.4 years. So while half of the women were affected for less than that time, half had symptoms longer — some for 14 years, researchers reported.

“It’s miserable, I’ll tell you what,” said Sharon Brown, 57, of Winston-Salem, N.C., who has endured hot flashes for six years. At her job at a tax and accounting office, she has had to stop wearing silk.

“I keep one of the little fans with me at all times — one in my purse, a couple in my desk, some in just random places in the office,” she said. “I’ll be so glad when they stop — if they ever stop.”

Over all, black and Hispanic women experienced hot flashes for significantly longer periods than white or Asian women. And in a particularly unfair hormonal twist, the researchers found that the earlier hot flashes started, the longer they were likely to continue.

Among women who got hot flashes before they stopped menstruating, the hot flashes were likely to continue for years after menopause, longer than for women whose symptoms began only when their periods had stopped.

“That having symptoms earlier in the transition bodes ill for your symptoms during menopause — that part is certainly new to me,” said Dr. C. Neill Epperson, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, who was not involved in the study. Perhaps, she and others suggested, early birds are more biologically sensitive to hormonal changes.

And many women fall into the early bird category. In this study, only a fifth of cases started after menopause. One in eight women began getting hot flashes while still having regular periods. For two-thirds of women, they began in perimenopause, when periods play hide and seek but have not completely disappeared.

In numerical terms, women who started getting hot flashes when they were still having regular periods or were in early perimenopause experienced symptoms for a median of 11.8 years. About nine of those years occurred after menopause, nearly three times the median of 3.4 years for women whose hot flashes did not start until their periods stopped.

“If you don’t have hot flashes until you’ve stopped menses, then you won’t have them as long,” said Nancy Avis, a professor of social sciences and health policy at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and the study’s first author. “If you start later, it’s a shorter total duration and it’s shorter from the last period on.”

Hot flashes, which can seize women many times a day and night — slathering them in sweat, flushing their faces — are linked to drops in estrogen and appear to be regulated by the hypothalamus in the brain. Studies have found that women with hot flash symptoms also face increased risk of cardiovascular problems and bone loss.

Researchers followed the women in the study, who came from seven American cities, from 1996 to 2013. All of them met the researchers’ definition for having frequent symptoms: hot flashes or night sweats at least six days in the previous two weeks.

None had had a hysterectomy or both ovaries removed, and none were on hormone therapy. (If they started taking hormone therapy during the study period, their data stopped being included, Dr. Avis said.)

Although some smaller studies have also found that symptoms can last many years, the new research drew praise from experts because, among other things, it included a larger and much more diverse group of women. One-third of them were African-Americans in Pittsburgh, Boston, Chicago and Ypsilanti, Mich. It also included women of Japanese descent in Los Angeles; women of Chinese descent in Oakland, Calif.; and Hispanic women in Newark — about 100 in each group.

“It’s such a real-world study of women we are seeing day in and day out,” said Dr. Risa Kagan, an obstetrician-gynecologist at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation in Berkeley. “There is no other study like this.”

About Black Patient

Health Information & Support │www.blackpatient.com │ www.twitter.com/blackpatient │ www.facebook.com/blackpatient

Leave a Reply

Subscribe to SMS

Get text messages such as vaccination reminders, antenatal/postnatal tips, health alerts, disease prevention and more straight to your mobile phone.

Opt out from SMS / Email